The supernova that triggered the birth of the solar system is being recreated in the laboratory

The supernova explosion that triggered the birth of the solar system has been recreated in a laboratory using a laser and foam ball, exciting a cloud of gas and dust.

Molecular clouds with the building blocks that lead to the sun and the planets, if alone, are always in a state of quiet equilibrium.

When triggered by an external event such as a shock wave sent from a supernova explosion, it forms pockets of dense matter and collapses to form a star.

According to researchers at the Polytechnic Institute of Paris in France, that is exactly what happened to the solar system. These phenomena were never observed, and mathematical simulations could not measure the problems involved, so the team turned to more potent tools.

They represented a dense region within a molecular cloud using a foam ball, and used a high-power laser to transmit an explosive wave, which propagates through the gas chamber and then into the ball – using X-ray images to observe the process.

The supernova explosion that triggered the birth of the solar system has been recreated in a laboratory using a laser and foam ball, exciting a cloud of gas and dust. Stock image

The exact origin of the solar system has been the subject of debate, theory and debate for decades, and may open a new avenue for new research experimentation.

The French team started from the idea that something needed to excite the cloud of gas and dust that led to the sun, earth and other planets.

A large star nearby exploded, scattering shock waves of high energy particles in space, and these would have collided in our calm cloud.

This process caused dust and gas to form around the proto-star, a dense region of dust and gas within the cloud, which helps to create planets around the spiral star, instead of collapsing back into the sun to form a larger star.

Astronomical observations do not have sufficient spatial clarity to observe these processes, and numerical simulations cannot handle the problem of interactions between clouds and supernova remnants.

So, inspiring and creating new stars in this way was largely a mystery until this new job.

Molecular clouds, which are the building blocks that lead to the sun and the planets, are always in quiet equilibrium when alone.

Molecular clouds, which are the building blocks that lead to the sun and the planets, are always in quiet equilibrium when alone.

When triggered by an external event such as a shock wave sent from a supernova explosion, it can form pockets of dense matter and form a star as it collapses.  Stock image

When triggered by an external event such as a shock wave sent from a supernova explosion, it can form pockets of dense matter and form a star as it collapses. Stock image

A team from several companies used a high-power laser and a foam ball to model the interaction between supernova residues and molecular clouds.

The foam ball represents a dense region within a molecular cloud that is associated with the pro star that will one day become the Sun.

The high-power laser generates an explosive wave, which marks the remnants of a supernova explosion, which propagates through the surrounding gas chamber and into the ball.

How do stars form?

Stars form from dense molecular clouds in areas of the galaxy known as stellar nurseries – dust and gas.

A molecular cloud consisting primarily of hydrogen atoms is thousands of times more abundant than the Sun.

They undergo turbulent movement with gas and dust over time, disturbing atoms and molecules so that some parts contain more material than others.

If enough gas and dust accumulate in an area, it will collapse under its own gravitational pull.

When it starts to fall, it heats up slowly and expands outwards, taking in more of the surrounding gas and dust.

At this point, when the region is about 900 billion miles across, it is in the early stages of becoming a pre-galaxy and becoming a star.

Then, over the next 50,000 years, it will shrink to 92 billion miles as the inner core of a star.

Excess material is ejected towards the star’s poles, forming a disk of gas and dust around the star, forming a proto-star.

The matter is then attached to the star or ejected into a vast disk that leads to the formation of planets, moons, comets and asteroids.

Experiments have shown that stars form from explosive waves coming from a supernova propagating through gas and dust – forming pockets of dense matter.

The simple experiment sheds new light on the evolution of the universe, which, to a certain extent, detected debris falling like a child star.

Co-author Bruno Albertasi said: ‘Our oldest molecular cloud formed by the sun may have been triggered by supernova remnants.

‘It opens a new and promising path for laboratory astronomy to understand all of these key points.’

According to the team, remnants of the material ejected from the ancient eruption are still found in ancient meteorite specimens.

Experts from the Free University of Berlin, the Russian Academy of Sciences, the University of Oxford and the University of Osaka are involved in this work.

Our solar system and all the objects that make up the planets were ejected by a supernova – the final stage of the life of massive stars.

Albertasi said: ‘We are really looking at the beginning of the relationship. In this way, you can see if the average density of the foam increases and stars begin to form easily.

Mechanisms affect the rate of star formation and galaxy evolution, explain the existence of very large stars – and have effects on our own solar system.

Some of the foam is compressed – while some is stretched. This changed the average density of the material.

Supernovae are the largest explosions in space. The pressure of a large star decreases so that the lower gravity takes over suddenly – it collapses in a few seconds.

The explosion is incredibly bright – and powerful enough to create new nuclei.

In the future, researchers will have to calculate the extended mass and the impact of the shock wave on star formation to actually measure the compressed object.

They plan to explore the impact of radiation, magnetic field and turbulence.

Albertazzi added: ‘This first paper was really about demonstrating the potential of this new operating system, which opens up a whole new level of exploration using high-power light beams.’

These findings are published in the journal Matter and Radiation at Extreme.

Supernovae occur when a giant star explodes

A supernova occurs when a star explodes and shoots debris and particles into space.

A supernova only burns for a short time, but it can tell scientists a lot about how the universe began.

For a kind of supernova scientists we live in an expanding universe, which is growing at an increasing rate.

Scientists have also determined that supernovae play an important role in the distribution of elements throughout the universe.

In 1987, astronomers observed a 'Titanic supernova' burning in a nearby galaxy with the force of 100 million suns (pictured).

In 1987, astronomers observed a ‘Titanic supernova’ burning in a nearby galaxy with the force of 100 million suns (pictured).

Two types of supernovae are known.

The carbon-oxygen white dwarf, one of the two stars, occurs in the first type of binary star system when it steals matter from its asteroid.

Eventually, the white dwarf accumulates excess material, causing the star to explode, causing a supernova.

The second type of supernova occurs at the end of a star’s lifetime.

As the star’s nuclear fuel is depleted, some of its mass flows to its center.

Eventually, the center becomes too heavy to withstand its own gravitational pull and the center collapses, causing another giant explosion.

Many elements found on Earth are formed at the center of the stars, and these elements travel to form new stars, planets, and everything in the universe.

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